More checks with lesser rules: A Flowbit magic tale

Hello, all! I waited to write this post for a long time in search of good examples. Finally decided to go with it with bland examples only. >.< Let me know in comments about some good scenarios where you might use this feature. Today’s post is about a feature recently added to Suricata’s flowbits. If you use Suricata and are into writing rules, you would probably be aware of what flowbits are all about. Don’t worry if you do not. Read further. Flowbits Suppose you want to match a packet in your network for a particular content but you would … Continue reading More checks with lesser rules: A Flowbit magic tale

Accidentally pushed the commits to the master of upstream? Uh Oh.

Hello all! Before I move forward with this post, I’d like to make it clear that I have NOT done this. Yet. The problem with people like me (who freak out too much) is that we are afraid of doing anything just because we’re scared we might fail. “Might” being the word of focus here. So, when I first received push access to one of popular projects, I was on cloud nine… But it did not take long for me to come down to.. Push access: AMAZING TAG + GREAT RESPONSIBILITY. Phew. When I was first supposed to push some … Continue reading Accidentally pushed the commits to the master of upstream? Uh Oh.

Are you writing docstrings right?

Hello all! Today’s post is about some underused inbuilt features specific to Cargo. People who have been using Rustlang would mostly be using Cargo as their default package manager and turns out it offers a wide variety of features. Its like Cargo picked up all things good from all other package managers and added Chemical X to make itself so powerful. We are going to see a feature that is mostly missed while writing code. Do you know you could write docs inside the code and compile it to generate an HTML document using no other packages? Example below. You … Continue reading Are you writing docstrings right?

SuriCon 2019: What a conference! – Part III

Helloooo everyone! This is the final blog post the SuriCon 2019 series and a sequel to SuriCon 2019: What a conference! – Part II. This covers the events on Day 3 of the conference. No developer brains were hurt during the conference (or so I believe). The day started with our amazing Dr Kelley Misata telling about OISF – Foundation Operations and News. She mentioned the myths about Suricata, our financials and announced the beginning of Suricata Support Services. Yes, you can now have support services for your firm which will be catered by the core members of the team. … Continue reading SuriCon 2019: What a conference! – Part III

SuriCon 2019: What a conference! – Part II

Hello, all! This blog post is a sequel to SuriCon 2019: What a conference! – Part I. This is going to cover Day 2 of the conference. We woke up at a relatively human time for this day. Oh I probably forgot mentioning that the registrations started at 7 AM on Day 1 so we were at the venue at 7 in the morning (some of us even before that). Although I was not expecting people to show up this early but the registration desk was full. (Can you believe it?!) The day started with Josh Stroschein talking about Suricata … Continue reading SuriCon 2019: What a conference! – Part II

SuriCon 2019: What a conference! – Part I

Hola! (I’m still on lesson 1 for Dutch on Duolingo 😦 ) How are you? I hope you are feeling awesome and if you’re not, you probably would by the end of this post. I joined OISF a little over a year ago and have been working on a wide range of things (check out suricata-update, suricata-verify, suricatasc, suricatactl and of course suricata) mostly under the guidance of my awesome mentor Jason Ish. I have always been encouraged, motivated and valued by the team members especially by the awesome support system Victor Julien. (Just in case you were wondering what … Continue reading SuriCon 2019: What a conference! – Part I

Revamping “Imbibe Linux” to “A couch potato’s promenade”

Hellloooo, everyone! Its been quite a dry year for this website. Well, I checked quite a number of things off my To-Do list as you can see below. I know, I know. Here is a cute baby husky picture to make up for it. Source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/129337820521427061 ANNOUNCEMENT: This website shall be undergoing one major change. It shall no longer be a blog about Linux. In fact, there will be much more to add. Biggest reason of bailing out on the blog was not being able to gather up theme oriented content all the time. Then of course, make that content … Continue reading Revamping “Imbibe Linux” to “A couch potato’s promenade”

inotify watch limit reached – Wait, what?

Hello! I come across the title of this blog post quite often. In my job, I deal with Django projects (the error is no way related to Django), there has been roughly a 4/10 chance of coming across this error (because we use watchdog). Every time it happened, I looked up stackoverflow and increased the watch limit by some random number as suggested by the solutions. This time, I realized it deserves more attention since it happens so frequently. On looking up, I found out watchdog python package uses native APIs as much as possible, which is why it relies … Continue reading inotify watch limit reached – Wait, what?

Do you need to use xargs?

Do you use xargs? I’ll be making a small utility using it (going to post about it soon). As I started reading up on it, I figured its a pretty cool command and can be really beneficial at times to execute multiple commands in one go. But, while reading and trying the commands, I had a question in mind, And so, I searched about it and obviously, I was not the first one to get this question in mind. Below is the compilation of things that I figured and some I found on the internet. Firstly, for those who do … Continue reading Do you need to use xargs?

The baffling source and sh

Hello everyone! Ever tried source and sh on some script and it worked with source but not with sh? I had this trouble sometime back. I was working on a python project and was supposed to activate virtual environment before starting off. However, not being very habitual of using virtual environments (I know its a bad practice, I take care now.), I did not remember how to activate it. Though, I knew there was an activate script that needed to be run, so I located it and did sh activate Didn’t work. Hmm. Permission issues. chmod +x activate Still won’t … Continue reading The baffling source and sh